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FACTS ABOUT CASHMERE, CAMEL AND WOOL

CLASSIFICATION:
CASHMERE, CAMEL HAIR, SHEEP WOOL: Nobles fibers



SOURCE:
CASHMERE
The Cashmere (Kashmir) or down goat. From the fine, soft undercoat or underlayer of hair. The straighter and coarser outer coat is called guard hair.

CAMEL HAIR
The two-humped Bactrian camel. From the fine, soft undercoat or underlayer of hair. The straighter and coarser outer coat is called guard hair.

SHEEP WOOL
The term wool is used for fibers from many species of “sheep” and also from other animals. The species commonly referred to as producing wool is "Ovis Aries" (sheep) in its many available breeds.



GEOGRAPHIC ORIGIN:
CASHMERE
From the high plateaus of Asia. Significant supplier countries are: China, Mongolia, Afghanistan and Iran. Today, little is supplied by the Kashmir Province of India, from which its name is derived. The cashmere products of this area first attracted the attention of Europeans in the early 1800s.

CAMEL HAIR
Significant supplier countries are: China, Mongolia, Iran, Afghanistan, Russia, New Zealand and Australia.

SHEEP WOOL
Fine wool is supplied in significant volumes by the following countries: Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and Argentina.



GATHERING PROCESS:
CASHMERE
The specialty animal hair fibers are collected during molting seasons when the animals naturally shed their hairs. Goats molt during a several-week period in spring. The down is removed by hand with a coarse comb or the animals are sheared.

CAMEL HAIR
The specialty animal hair fibers are collected during molting seasons when the animals naturally shed their hairs. From late spring to early summer, camels shed their hair. Fallen clumps of hair are still collected by traditional hand-gathering methods.

SHEEP WOOL
Sheep wool is sheared once a year from the animal. The shearing process is carried out by professional and skilled shearers in order to increase productivity and keep the best part of the fleece separated by the ordinary and dirtier parts of the wool (usually the wool from the belly and legs).



PRODUCTION:
CASHMERE & CAMEL HAIR
There are five primary steps to cashmere and camel hair production:
- Collection
- Sorting, scouring
- Dehairing
- Spinning
- Weaving or knitting
SORTING, SCOURING - Hand sorting for coarse hair takes place. After sorting, the fiber is washed to remove dirt, grease and any vegetable matter gathered in the collection process.
DEHAIRING - The scoured material is then dehaired. This step removes vegetable matter, dandruff and the coarse outer guard hair. At the end of this process, the fiber is ready to be spun into yarns for weaving or knitting.

SHEEP WOOL
The production of wool starts with shearing the sheep. After the different parts of the fleece are sorted the following steps are basically the same as cashmere and camel hair.



ANNUAL YIELD:
CASHMERE
Up to one pound of fiber per goat, with the average 0.1 to 0.2kg of underdown.

CAMEL HAIR
Approximately 8 to 10 kilograms.

SHEEP WOOL
Depends on the breed. Yields for sheep producing fine and superfine wool vary between 2.5 to 4 kg.



WARMTH:
CASHMERE, CAMEL HAIR & SHEEP WOOL
Natural light-weight insulation without bulk.

CASHMERE
Extremely warm to protect goats from cold mountain temperatures. Fibers are highly adaptable and are easily constructed into fine or thick yarns, and light to heavy-weight fabrics. Appropriate for all climates. A high moisture content allows insulation properties to change with the relative humidity in the air.

CAMEL HAIR
Has thermostatic properties which protect and insulate the camel in high mountain cold and blizzards while keeping cool in desert heat. Camel hair garments are worn by native desert travelers to protect them from the heat. These same characteristics are transferred to fabrics made from camel hair.

SHEEP WOOL
Wool is very warm but it also protects sheep from sun during the hot season. Wool fibers are highly crimped providing elasticity and resilience, this makes wool very versatile. Depending on how the yarns and fabric are constructed it is possible to create products fit for any season.



HAND:
CASHMERE & CAMEL HAIR
Luxuriously soft, with high napability and loft.

SHEEP WOOL
Soft, but also elastic and resilient.



NATURAL COLORS:
CASHMERE
Gray, brown and white.

CAMEL HAIR
Golden tan.

SHEEP WOOL
White



DYEABILITY:
CASHMERE, CAMEL HAIR & SHEEP WOOL
Capable of dyeing to a broad range of colors. Accepts dye equally as well as wool.



BEST BLENDS:
CASHMERE
Pure virgin* fiber or blended with wool, silk or cotton. Blends with nylon or tri-blends with wool and nylon in woven patterns may indicate the use of inferior quality recycled** fiber. Nylon, however, is used with virgin quality cashmere in hosiery and some other knitted products.

CAMEL HAIR
Pure virgin* fiber or blended with wool only. Blends with nylon or tri-blends with wool and nylon in woven patterns may indicate the use of inferior quality recycled** fiber. Nylon, however, is used with virgin quality camel hair in hosiery and some other knitted products.

SHEEP WOOL
Virgin wool performs well alone, but is also extremely versatile and can be blended with many fibers depending on the use. With cashmere and silk to increase luxury. With synthetics for sport or more technical applications.



GARMENT CARE:
CASHMERE, CAMEL HAIR & SHEEP WOOL
Dry clean wovens; knit goods may be hand washed, or depending on specials cycles available in some selected models also machine washed.



END USES:
CASHMERE, CAMEL HAIR & SHEEP WOOL
Men's and women's coats, jackets and blazers, skirts, hosiery, sweaters, gloves, scarves, mufflers, caps and robes.



*VIRGIN FIBER:
CASHMERE, CAMEL HAIR & SHEEP WOOL
New fiber that has not been processed in any way, or has been made into yarns, fabrics or garments for the first time.



**RECYCLED FIBER:
CASHMERE, CAMEL HAIR & SHEEP WOOL
Fibers reclaimed from scraps or fabrics that were previously woven or felted and may or may not have been used by the consumer.

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